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07

Jul

States, including Ohio, debate minimum wage

Thirteen states, including Ohio, are increasing their minimum wages instead of waiting around for Congress to act. While minimum wage employees and activists are happy with the raise, economists are split.

15

Apr

Breaking News from Boston

According to a phone conversation with an officer from the Boston Police Department’s media affairs office, the explosions occurred at 673 Boston St. in Boston, Mass.  EMS and Boston Fire are at the scene, and multiple injuries have been reported.  No further information is available at this time, and the officer wasn’t able to comment as to whether or not the event is suspected to be a terrorist attack.

-Jennifer-Leigh Oprihory, Medill News Service

27

Feb

WASHINGTON — Lawmakers unveiled Tuesday a statue of civil rights legend Rosa Parks that will stand in National Statuary Hall.
Rosa Parks is famous for refusing to give up her seat to a white man on an Alabama public bus in 1955. She died in 2005 and became the first woman to lie in state in the U.S. Capitol rotunda.
"We celebrate a seamstress slight in stature but mighty in courage," President Barack Obama said. "She defied the odds. She defied injustice. In a single moment, with the simplest of gestures, she helped change America and change the world."
Obama was joined by House Speaker John Boehner, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, members of the Parks family and other top officials.
“May this statue long be at tribute to her strength and spirit, her legacy and her leadership,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said. 
Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-S.C., a civil rights leader, said the rights Parks fought for could be rolled back, referring to the Supreme Court case being heard today that could invalidate parts of the Voting Rights Act.
Parks was a symbol of the civil rights movement that reached its climax in the 1960s, when she collaborated with the NAACP and other famous figures like Martin Luther King Jr.
—Marshall Cohen

WASHINGTON — Lawmakers unveiled Tuesday a statue of civil rights legend Rosa Parks that will stand in National Statuary Hall.

Rosa Parks is famous for refusing to give up her seat to a white man on an Alabama public bus in 1955. She died in 2005 and became the first woman to lie in state in the U.S. Capitol rotunda.

"We celebrate a seamstress slight in stature but mighty in courage," President Barack Obama said. "She defied the odds. She defied injustice. In a single moment, with the simplest of gestures, she helped change America and change the world."

Obama was joined by House Speaker John Boehner, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, members of the Parks family and other top officials.

“May this statue long be at tribute to her strength and spirit, her legacy and her leadership,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said. 

Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-S.C., a civil rights leader, said the rights Parks fought for could be rolled back, referring to the Supreme Court case being heard today that could invalidate parts of the Voting Rights Act.

Parks was a symbol of the civil rights movement that reached its climax in the 1960s, when she collaborated with the NAACP and other famous figures like Martin Luther King Jr.

—Marshall Cohen

19

Feb

Conservative spin of the day

Right-leaning website The Daily Caller slams the mainstream media for its complaints over weekend availability to President Barack Obama’s golf outing with Tiger Woods.

12

Feb

Who are the special guests of SOTU tonight?

An undocumented immigrant student, Tim Cook of Apple, Tony Bennett, gun violence victims including Hadiya Pendleton’s parents, Ted Nugent, 102-year-old Desiline Victor and a Sandy Hook teacher.

And one of these is not like the other.

Don’t forget to wear your favorite top hat and beard toupee today to celebrate Abraham Lincoln’s 204th birthday! Some fun facts:
He did not have a middle name.
He was born in a town called Sinking Spring Farm in Kentucky.
He was the first president to wear (and work) a beard. 
He vetoed and pocket vetoed only seven bills throughout his presidency.
Two years before his assassination, he actually saw John Wilkes Booth in the play, A Marble Heart. 
As a lawyer, he had argued one case before the Supreme Court: Lewis v. Lewis, 1845.
"Whatever you are, be a good one," he once said, sounding a bit like Dr. Seuss.

Don’t forget to wear your favorite top hat and beard toupee today to celebrate Abraham Lincoln’s 204th birthday! Some fun facts:

  • He did not have a middle name.
  • He was born in a town called Sinking Spring Farm in Kentucky.
  • He was the first president to wear (and work) a beard. 
  • He vetoed and pocket vetoed only seven bills throughout his presidency.
  • Two years before his assassination, he actually saw John Wilkes Booth in the play, A Marble Heart
  • As a lawyer, he had argued one case before the Supreme Court: Lewis v. Lewis, 1845.
  • "Whatever you are, be a good one," he once said, sounding a bit like Dr. Seuss.

15

Jan

Supreme Court hears argument about U.S. government’s immunity to military medical battery charges

WASHINGTON – A government lawyer told the Supreme Court Tuesday that the federal government cannot be held liable for claims brought against military medical personnel, but the justices interrupted with frequent challenges.

The case, Levin v. United States, involves a military veteran who sued a naval surgeon in Guam for battery and negligent medical malpractice. It began in 2003, when Steven Levin gave written consent to a cataract surgery performed by Lt. Cmdr. Frank Bishop, but unsuccessfully tried to verbally withdraw before the procedure.  Subsequently, Levin suffered complications and sued the surgeon.

The United States government took on the role as sole defendant because the Gonzalez Act grants military medical personnel immunity from tort claims.

The U.S. District Court for Guam dismissed the case, saying that under the Federal Tort Claims Act, the government is not liable for tort claims involving battery.

In his appeal, Levin argued that another provision under the Gonzalez Act excludes FTCA’s protection of the government in battery claims brought against military medical personnel. However, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals dismissed Levin’s claim.

Read More

08

Nov

Fox News, Huffington Post “most-sexist” in coverage of election, advocacy groups say

An advocacy group said on Thursday that Fox News and the Huffington Post were the awardees for most-sexist media coverage of women candidates during the 2012 election cycle.  

"Name It. Change It.," a non-partisan project of the Women’s Media Center, She Should Run and Political Parity, announced this years most-sexist media recipients in a webinar Thursday afternoon.  The projects seeks to expose and eliminate sexist and misogynistic coverage of women candidates.

Huffington Post won for creating sexist standards for women in politics.  Citing articles on former presidential candidate Michele Bachman’s make-up and clothes,  The group illustrated the point that women politicians are more often scrutinized on their appearance than their male counterparts.  

Fox News won for most sexist insult for repeatedly calling DNC Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz “Frizilla”.  Other awardees included Boston Herald columnist, Howie Carr for referring to Senator-elect Elizabeth Warren as “Granny”.

The Chicago Sun-Times won for most-sexist interview question.  Reporters asked whether a woman can be a parent and governor.  

Moderator Liz Benjamin won most-sexist debate question for asking candidates Kirsten Gillibrand and Wendy Long whether they had read Fifty Shades of Grey.

A nationwide survey of 800 potential voters done by the Lake Research Center revealed that sexist comments about a woman candidate negatively affects her likelihood to be elected.  ”Voters will vote for a man they don’t like.  But they will not vote for a woman they don’t like,” president Celinda Lake said.  

Engaging in sexism hurts the male opponent, but no more than negative campaigning in general.  However, responding to sexism regained the vote and damaged the opponent.  

With a historic numbers of women elected to national offices in Tuesday, the survey goes to show how some of them endured and confronted sexism during their campaigns.  

Opponents to Wisconsin Senator-elect Tammy Baldwin alluded that her sexual orientation made unqualified to serve.  

Representative-elect Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., outright called comments by her opponent, Rep. Joe Walsh, sexist.  Walsh, along with several other male incumbents who made blatantly sexists remarks during campaigns were defeated on Tuesday.  

— Adam Jabari Jefferson, Medill News Service

07

Mar

Medill News Service Afternoon Roundup

Here’s the roundup of today’s stories:

Intel Chair says intelligence sharing critical to cyber defense - Lawmakers made the case for intelligence sharing to combat cyber defense Wednesday at a panel at the Heritage Foundation. Medill national security reporter Edwin Rios covered the event.

Latino community joining civil rights march to protest anti-immigration laws - Latino groups marched against anti-immigration legislation in Alabama. Check out Safiya Merchant's story and photo slideshow.

L.A. Mayor hits Republicans for holding up transportation bill - Antonio Villaraigosa, mayor of Los Angeles and chairman of the Democratic National Convention, criticized partisan bickering at Wednesday’s Politico Playbook Breakfast. Ed Demaria was up early to file his report.

As always, follow @medillonthehill on Twitter and visit Medill on the Hill for more.

01

Dec

life:

It has been 30 years today since the AIDS virus was officially recognized.
In November, 1990, LIFE magazine published a photograph of a young man,  David Kirby — his body wasted by AIDS, his gaze locked on something  beyond this world — surrounded by anguished family members as he took  his last breaths. The haunting image of Kirby’s passing (above), taken  by a journalism grad student named Therese Frare, became the one  photograph most identified with the HIV/AIDS epidemic that, by then, had  seen as many as 12 million people infected.
(see more — The Photo That Brought AIDS Home)

life:

It has been 30 years today since the AIDS virus was officially recognized.

In November, 1990, LIFE magazine published a photograph of a young man, David Kirby — his body wasted by AIDS, his gaze locked on something beyond this world — surrounded by anguished family members as he took his last breaths. The haunting image of Kirby’s passing (above), taken by a journalism grad student named Therese Frare, became the one photograph most identified with the HIV/AIDS epidemic that, by then, had seen as many as 12 million people infected.

(see more The Photo That Brought AIDS Home)

nwkarchivist:

The AIDS Virus Was Officially Recognized 30 Years Ago Today.  Featuring A Few Of The 16 Covers We’ve Produced.

The deadly disease first broke out in the homosexual communities of New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles. Later, it cropped up among heroin addicts, Haitian refugees and victims of hemophilia. And now, public-health experts fear, the epidemic has spread to infants and even unwary patients receiving blood transfusions. With each new case, they have become more alarmed — particularly because the cause of the illness is unknown.

Experts call the new disease acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), meaning a breakdown in the body’s natural defenses that often leads to fatal forms of cancer and lethal bouts of infection. AIDS was first recognized in 1981. The Centers for Disease Control have now documented 827 cases, with 312 deaths, around the United States. The 38 percent mortality rate makes the disease as menacing as smallpox once was and considerably more deadly than such recent baffling epidemics as Legionnaire’s disease and toxic shock syndrome. Dr. Henry Masur of the National Institutes of Health notes that none of the victims he has studied has lived more than 18 months. “Once they develop a severe case of the disease, I suspect they all die,” he says.

Newsweek December 27, 1982

23

Nov

Stunning set of images: Reuters chooses the best photos of 2011.