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27

Feb

WASHINGTON — Lawmakers unveiled Tuesday a statue of civil rights legend Rosa Parks that will stand in National Statuary Hall.
Rosa Parks is famous for refusing to give up her seat to a white man on an Alabama public bus in 1955. She died in 2005 and became the first woman to lie in state in the U.S. Capitol rotunda.
"We celebrate a seamstress slight in stature but mighty in courage," President Barack Obama said. "She defied the odds. She defied injustice. In a single moment, with the simplest of gestures, she helped change America and change the world."
Obama was joined by House Speaker John Boehner, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, members of the Parks family and other top officials.
“May this statue long be at tribute to her strength and spirit, her legacy and her leadership,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said. 
Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-S.C., a civil rights leader, said the rights Parks fought for could be rolled back, referring to the Supreme Court case being heard today that could invalidate parts of the Voting Rights Act.
Parks was a symbol of the civil rights movement that reached its climax in the 1960s, when she collaborated with the NAACP and other famous figures like Martin Luther King Jr.
—Marshall Cohen

WASHINGTON — Lawmakers unveiled Tuesday a statue of civil rights legend Rosa Parks that will stand in National Statuary Hall.

Rosa Parks is famous for refusing to give up her seat to a white man on an Alabama public bus in 1955. She died in 2005 and became the first woman to lie in state in the U.S. Capitol rotunda.

"We celebrate a seamstress slight in stature but mighty in courage," President Barack Obama said. "She defied the odds. She defied injustice. In a single moment, with the simplest of gestures, she helped change America and change the world."

Obama was joined by House Speaker John Boehner, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, members of the Parks family and other top officials.

“May this statue long be at tribute to her strength and spirit, her legacy and her leadership,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said. 

Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-S.C., a civil rights leader, said the rights Parks fought for could be rolled back, referring to the Supreme Court case being heard today that could invalidate parts of the Voting Rights Act.

Parks was a symbol of the civil rights movement that reached its climax in the 1960s, when she collaborated with the NAACP and other famous figures like Martin Luther King Jr.

—Marshall Cohen

25

Aug

The McLee family takes pictures in front of the new Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial. (Photo by Bob Spoerl/Medill News Service)

The McLee family takes pictures in front of the new Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial. (Photo by Bob Spoerl/Medill News Service)

The dedication of the new memorial is slated for Sunday in Washington. 

ourpresidents:

“It seemed as if every time he spoke, he said something I wanted or needed to hear” said Rosa Parks of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Pictured here, Martin Luther King, Jr. speaks at the Civil Rights March on Washington D.C.  MLK in the crowd at the March.  Leaders of the March meeting with President Kennedy in the White House.  August 28, 1963. 

The Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial opened this week in Washington D.C.  More posts to come in celebration of Dr. King and the anniversary of the March on Washington D.C.

22

Aug

MLK memorial is now open on the Mall

While the official unveiling won’t take place until Sunday, visitors can see Washington’s newest stone statue over the next few days. 

Did you know…

  • The first celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s birthday was 25 years ago. More than 6 million people signed the petition to make it a national holiday—the largest petition in U.S. history.
  • MLK was a vegetarian.
  • He is the youngest person to ever win the Nobel Peace Prize.
  • King never graduated high school, but he has Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Divinity, and Ph.D. in theology.
  • The most famous part of his most famous speech—the final moments of “I have a dream” in 1963—were partially improvised, loosely based on a speech he had given in Detroit earlier in the year.

MLK memorial official site.