Esquire Theme by Matthew Buchanan
Social icons by Tim van Damme

26

Feb

Spotted at Capitol Hill: Seth Rogen

image
Comedian Seth Rogen testified about the importance of Alzheimer’s research before a Senate appropriations subcommittee Wednesday. Rogen is a champion of the Alzheimer’s Association.  His testimony drew laughs from everyone present. Here are a few of his best jokes:

1. "Thank you for the opportunity to testify today and for the opportunity to be called an expert in something, because that’s cool," Rogen said. "I don’t know if you know who I am, chairman. I know you never saw Knocked Up, which is a little insulting.”
Harkin also drew a laugh with his response: ”I want the record to note that this is the first time, I will wager, this is the first time in any congressional hearing in history that the words ‘knocked up’ have ever been spoken.”
2. “I should first answer a question I assume many of you are asking. Yes, I’m aware this has nothing to do with the legalization of marijuana.”
Rogen said Alzheimer’s research funding is an issue that’s even more important to him.
3. “I came here today for a few reasons: One … I’m a huge House of Cards fan.” Rogen added he felt it was important for him to testify because he’s frustrated with how expensive it is to care for someone with Alzheimer’s and because he wants to show others dealing with Alzheimer’s that they aren’t alone in their struggles.
                                                                                          — Sara Olstad

18

Apr

The eight senators who recently unveiled their immigration bill held a press conference Thursday. Watch some of the highlights from each senator’s speech to the 11 million undocumented immigrants and people who question immigration reform.

—Videography by Brina Monterroza, Medill News Service

27

Feb

WASHINGTON — Lawmakers unveiled Tuesday a statue of civil rights legend Rosa Parks that will stand in National Statuary Hall.
Rosa Parks is famous for refusing to give up her seat to a white man on an Alabama public bus in 1955. She died in 2005 and became the first woman to lie in state in the U.S. Capitol rotunda.
"We celebrate a seamstress slight in stature but mighty in courage," President Barack Obama said. "She defied the odds. She defied injustice. In a single moment, with the simplest of gestures, she helped change America and change the world."
Obama was joined by House Speaker John Boehner, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, members of the Parks family and other top officials.
“May this statue long be at tribute to her strength and spirit, her legacy and her leadership,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said. 
Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-S.C., a civil rights leader, said the rights Parks fought for could be rolled back, referring to the Supreme Court case being heard today that could invalidate parts of the Voting Rights Act.
Parks was a symbol of the civil rights movement that reached its climax in the 1960s, when she collaborated with the NAACP and other famous figures like Martin Luther King Jr.
—Marshall Cohen

WASHINGTON — Lawmakers unveiled Tuesday a statue of civil rights legend Rosa Parks that will stand in National Statuary Hall.

Rosa Parks is famous for refusing to give up her seat to a white man on an Alabama public bus in 1955. She died in 2005 and became the first woman to lie in state in the U.S. Capitol rotunda.

"We celebrate a seamstress slight in stature but mighty in courage," President Barack Obama said. "She defied the odds. She defied injustice. In a single moment, with the simplest of gestures, she helped change America and change the world."

Obama was joined by House Speaker John Boehner, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, members of the Parks family and other top officials.

“May this statue long be at tribute to her strength and spirit, her legacy and her leadership,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said. 

Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-S.C., a civil rights leader, said the rights Parks fought for could be rolled back, referring to the Supreme Court case being heard today that could invalidate parts of the Voting Rights Act.

Parks was a symbol of the civil rights movement that reached its climax in the 1960s, when she collaborated with the NAACP and other famous figures like Martin Luther King Jr.

—Marshall Cohen

26

Nov

The Capitol Christmas tree arrived Monday in Garfield Circle.  Santa Claus spread the holiday spirit as workers put up the 65-foot Engelmann spruce from Colorado.

—Photos by Alison Burdo, Medill News Service

21

Feb

President Barack Obama’s fiscal year 2013 budget sparked contentious debate on Capitol Hill, as the Obama Administration proposed $1 trillion in cuts across the board to reduce federal spending.
August’s debt deal mandates that Congress must make a further $1.2 trillion by Jan. 2013, or else automatic sequestration cuts will take effect.
Although many on the Hill were angered after nearly a half-trillion dollars was slashed from the defense budget, analysis of Google internet traffic shows searches for defense spending has dropped in February. Searches regarding education spending, meanwhile, have seen modest gains. 
By David Uberti

President Barack Obama’s fiscal year 2013 budget sparked contentious debate on Capitol Hill, as the Obama Administration proposed $1 trillion in cuts across the board to reduce federal spending.

August’s debt deal mandates that Congress must make a further $1.2 trillion by Jan. 2013, or else automatic sequestration cuts will take effect.

Although many on the Hill were angered after nearly a half-trillion dollars was slashed from the defense budget, analysis of Google internet traffic shows searches for defense spending has dropped in February. Searches regarding education spending, meanwhile, have seen modest gains. 

By David Uberti

17

Nov

One of the perks of being a Hill staffer? Easier access to The News York Times wedding page

The Hill reports that Capitol Hill staffers are more likely than the rest of us to get a coveted announcement on the ultra-exclusive Weddings/Celebrations pages of The New York Times

(Source: thehill.com)

House leaders plan Facebook hackathon

Not sure what to pack for when reporting in Washington? Find out what to expect of women’s fashion on Capitol Hill. — By Chelsea Wallis, Medill News Service

16

Nov

nationaljournal:

PHOTO OF THE DAY: House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, D-Md., right, answers questions after a news conference on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. Huddling behind him, from left are, Rep. Tim Walz, D-Minn., Sen. Kent Conrad, D-N.D., and Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va. (PHOTO: Carolyn Kaster/AP)

nationaljournal:

PHOTO OF THE DAY: House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, D-Md., right, answers questions after a news conference on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. Huddling behind him, from left are, Rep. Tim Walz, D-Minn., Sen. Kent Conrad, D-N.D., and Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va. (PHOTO: Carolyn Kaster/AP)

14

Nov

Team Gabby Giffords

What Would Gabby Do? After the shooting, Gabby Giffords needed help to be herself—and her astronaut husband led the team, Steve Fishman writes in New York magazine.

03

Aug

Even reporters are there to help

davidcharns:

(This is what it looks like when you mess up your stand-up in front of experienced cameramen.)

I wrote a blog post for Medill’s Washington 2.0 about my experience covering politics with other members of the press, who more than not, turned out to be helpful. Maybe it was because my sweaty face and lost look screamed “Help me!” Here’s an excerpt,

At the Capitol, cameramen who shoot dozens of standups a day were right there to press record if you needed them, or light your head with their fancy equipment so you didn’t have a huge shadow covering part of your face. At the White House, a ABC crewwoman named Vicki not only calmed my nerves as I set up my camera on a riser in the East Room (the order went: NBC, FOX, CBS, ABC, Medill), but she also gave me a brief tour of the press offices in the West Wing. (Did you know the White House Briefing Room is on top of what was the White House swimming pool?)

Follow @davidcharns